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Discussion: Slap hit

Posted Discussion
April 17
softballjunkie13

9 posts
Hi, We had an umpire call an out on our player for slap hit. He said illegal even though she broke her wrist. I looked up and nothing states you can't slap hit. Did find 1.13 • CHOPPED BALL
A chopped ball occurs when the batter strikes downward with a chopping
motion of the bat so that the ball bounces high into the air. EFFECT: The player
will be called out and the ball is dead.

Her ball barely bounced. Can someone clarify, he said out, slapping even though she broke her wrist. She didn't mean to slap it, she reached for a short flat pitch.
April 17
DaveDowell
Men's 70
4330 posts
The Definition at §1.13 • CHOPPED BALL in the rule book is not the place you should be looking ... I wasn't there to see it, but reading your post seems to infer that the third criteria mentioned in the following rule, based on an umpire's judgment, resulted in the "Out" call ...
__________

§7.6 • BATTER IS OUT
.
E. When the batter bunts or chops the ball, or does not take a full swing when deliberately hitting a pitched ball.
__________

April 17
Turning2
Men's 70
204 posts
Umpire was wrong if she didn’t chop the ball down resulting in a high hop,and difficult force out at first on a quick runner, as well as anyone that would interpret the rule as anything less than a “swing” as poster clearly stated that the batter “broke her wrist during the swing” Sad that there are a growing number of umpires that get many applications of the written rules so wrong.
April 17
softballjunkie13

9 posts
Thanks the ball went to ss, it was an ugly swing reaching for short pitch.
He said yes she broke her wrist. Thanks
April 18
B.J.

1108 posts
softballjunkie.. there is no rule that says a batter must break their wrists and I agree with you that a slap hit is legal.. and it has nothing to so with the chopping the ball rule as DD stated above

I have never liked part of the wording in SSUSA rule 7.6 (or does not take a full swing when deliberately hitting a pitched ball) and in the past I have asked SSUSA to define what a full swing is but never did actually receive an answer other than I'll know it when i see it ..lol

to me a "FULL SWING" is when a batter starts with the bat back behind their trail shoulder and then swings forward following thru completely and having the bat end up over their forward shoulder as a batter with power going for a HR .. then you have hitters who do swing the bat but usually take a 1/2 to a 3/4 swing when hitting to the opposite field .. to me that is still a legal hit but it was DEFINITELY not a full swing.. should they be called out per the wording of rule 7.6 ??
April 18
stick8

1992 posts
If you break your wrist guess what? You’re going to a hospital and you’re on the sidelines for several weeks.
Yes the batter cannot chop. Dead ball out
The batter must follow thru on his/her swing. There is no rule that says it has to be a certain speed. It can be a slow speed follow thru.
The batter cannot stop his/her swing, I consider that a bunt.
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