https://www.vspdirect.com/softball/welcome?utm_source=softball&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=partner

 
SIGN IN:   Password     »Sign up

Message board   »Message Board home    »Sign-in or register to get started

Online now: 1 member: dkrollw364; 47 anonymous
Change topic:

Details for Rainmans


Real name:
Steve Schmidt

Location:
Prescott, AZ

Division:

Messages posted by Rainmans »Message board home   »Start a new discussion

April 10, 2022
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Umpire's call

Ump was in a great position, however, it was a bad throw from the outfield.
Nov. 11, 2018
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: What is a Veteran?

I believe everyday should be Veterans Day!

I wanted to get my thanks out early to all the veterans of our military services that have put their lives on the line to protect the freedoms that we enjoy. They have dedicated their lives to their country and deserve to be recognized for their commitment.
Nov. 10, 2018
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: What is a Veteran?

A “Veteran” – whether active duty, discharged, retired, or reserve – is someone who, at one point in life, wrote a blank check made payable to “The Unites States of America”, for an amount of “up to and including his or her life.”

There are not words big enough.
There is not a hug strong enough.
This is not a smile big enough.
All I can offer is thank you.
You are my hero.
You are in my thoughts.
You are in my prayers.
For all of you’ve done, thank you!

With my deepest and humble respect,

Steve
Sept. 25, 2018
Rainmans
Topic: Tournaments
Discussion: Results of Las Vegas

There are pros and cons of open-source solutions or proprietary software. Proprietary software has been a popular but open-source solutions can have an advantage. Proprietary solutions I.e., SSUSA) have a number of disadvantages that should be considered.

One of the biggest drawbacks of any proprietary software is the licensing fee – is SSUSA paying for this? Developers often sell their products, they charge for access to their product, and the license fees can be substantial. Open-source software, on the other hand, is generally cheaper than proprietary options, and in some cases may be available for use at no cost. The cost of training and support may partially offset this advantage.

With the use of proprietary software, SSUSA is reliant on the developer for all updates, support, and fixes. Updates may be slow (or non-existent) and it may take some time to address security holes or other problems. In addition, if the developer leaves, retires, or passes, SSUSA may have no further updates or support. Open-source software, on the other hand, may have a number of different teams working on the code at once, and anyone can pick up a discontinued project and expand on it since the source code is public.

Open-source software is typically patched to address security threats faster than proprietary programs, simply due to the source code’s availability to the public. With many eyes searching for loopholes, potential threats become obvious quickly. Proprietary software systems rely on the developer to identify problems, or worse, security loopholes discovered in the wild. Some proprietary developers notoriously rely on “security through obscurity”, attempting to quash information about security weaknesses to prevent outsiders from using it.

Open-source software generally offers more customization options than proprietary systems. In many cases, what you see is what you get with a proprietary software package; you simply license it as is. With open-source programs, there may be many different customized versions of the same software -- if not, a version cab be tailored to the needs or create one using the program’s source code.

Sept. 16, 2018
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Arroyo Grande

There are trees along each base line, the bleachers have limited shade depending the angle of the sun...bring chairs to sit along the fence lines.
Aug. 5, 2018
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: 60 Major in Sacramento

60 M+ - Summy's
60 M - Sin City

July 7, 2018
Rainmans
Topic: Rules of the game
Discussion: Speed up game

I don't understand the obsession of the wanting to speed up the game. It appears the vocal crowd is inconvenienced by the general principle of the sport. Perhaps these individuals who want specific/significant changes should explore starting another softball league to incorporate different formats (e.g., shorter time limits, virtual gaming…).

This topic has been beaten to death, however, there isn’t a cat so flat that you can’t run it over one more time.

June 28, 2018
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Hitting Clinics coming up in July

We are very fortunate to have this level of instruction in our area. I would recommend to any players looking to increase their batting average and learn from a staff of professionals. If you are looking for a no-nonsense and high energy-learning environment, then this is the clinic for you...worth every penny.

Steve has the best hitting hands I’ve ever had the pleasure to, observe, play with/against, and take hitting lessons from...he is a great coach/instructor as he tells, explains, demonstrates, and inspires.

Jan. 12, 2018
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Drum Roll...the Starting Count decision results.

A way to ensure 7 innings, maximize the number of ‘at bats’ per game, get more games played in a day, minimize boredom, reduce injuries would be to (not all inclusive):

• Use a 1-pitch format
• Use an over-the-line format
• Use a 1-pitch over-the-line format
• Use a video game format (reduced travel, equipment costs, and tournament fees)

Jan. 12, 2018
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Drum Roll...the Starting Count decision results.

The spirited debate on the 0-0 vs. 1-1 count has been fascinating to follow. Fortunately or unfortunately depending where you sit, the 40 – 60 year old groups will be using the 1-1 count (one “waste foul” ball) this season. As it Dave Dowell stated, “Be Careful What You Ask For, You Might Just Get It!"

It’s interesting that 23% of the SSUSA population represented the majority (22,877 – I’m sure there are many reasons as to why individuals didn’t vote) of the individuals that signed up for SSUSA. Makes one wonder if the entire population had voted if it would have made any difference in the final outcome of the vote. Statisticians can provide a probability but it there is always uncertainty and we’ll never know because it didn’t happen. Either way, we have to live with the changes or choose not to play in SSUSA.

I agree with OZ40, “Just getting in 7 innings (which may or may not happen anyway) shouldn't be the defining factor of a good game vs a bad game.”

Slow-pitch softball has changed over the decades (originally an indoor game for baseball players looking to maintain their dexterity during the off season) and we’ve all adapted (like it or not) if we wanted to continue to play. Sure, different organizations (e.g., USSSA, ASA, ISF, NSA…) where created to adapt various rules of the game because there were groups of individuals that didn’t like the changes or wanted their own versions of the game. Early on, softball was similar to baseball from when there were (not all inclusive):

• No time limit restrictions
• No limit on the number of hit foul balls
• 7 innings of play
• Stealing of bases was allowed

The game has undergone numerous modifications since its creation in 1887, but it is still one of the most preferred sports games in the country and has developed a following in several countries throughout the world.

Play ball!

Dec. 14, 2017
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: survey

So many people stomp, pout, and spew anger and insults around because they don’t get their way, feel they’ve been slighted, they’re irritated about the rules, politics (as I was told senior softball consists of clicks and politics), disagree with coaches, umpires, directors… this has been born out of the sheer growth of this sport. But, here is the thing! This is slow-pitch softball. It’s not personal. And if it is personal, and awful – then why stick around!?! There are no scouts in the stands and we ain’t as young or good as we once were – you don’t know what you’ve got until you lose it but, you knew exactly what you had; you just thought you’d never lose it.

Given that preamble, it appears people are troubled with (not all inclusive – enter your own):

• Getting 7 innings completed before the allotted play time

• Being bored (the game is too slow) in the field waiting for the batter to swing at the ball

• Taking too long for the team(s) to get from the dugout out to the field and vice versa

• Taking too much time for the batter getting into the batter’s box (performing an elaborate ritual)

• Scheduling of the tournaments (2-3 days) is too long/expensive

•Incorporating baseball format/rules (as someone stated, “…this softball not baseball…”)

• Trying to put that braid in your hair but realizing it was a mistake after the first time you take off your hat

Here are some suggestions (i.e., grist for your mill) to consider that could potentially resolve some of the aforementioned concerns(not all inclusive – add your own):

• Use a 1-pitch format – this would speed up the game, reduce boredom, reduce the time of each game (30-35 minutes), get more games played per day, reduce some tournaments to 1-day

• Use an over-the-line format – same as the above, also reduces injuries from having to run bases (hit and sit)

• Use a 1-pitch over-the-line format – same as above

• Use a 1-pitch and/or over-the-line format with plastic bats and nerf balls – same as above, and also reduce the cost of equipment

I’m being somewhat facetious but in my own skewed perspective I’m also being serious. There will be those who see the cynical humor and others will take offense – some are offended because someone didn’t offend them.

Dec. 8, 2017
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: rotator cuff surgery re attachment of the supraspinatus

My rotator cuff tendons completely detached from the bone (humerus) on my throwing arm, I had bone spurs that rubbed on the rotator cuff tendon that contributed to weakening of the tendon, and a torn labrum that acts like a gasket to help hold the ball of your arm bone securely within the socket.

I had the surgery at 58 years old (64 now). After the surgery (it was painful), I couldn’t lift my right hand without help from my left hand. I couldn’t lay horizontally for a several weeks after the surgery because it felt like someone was pushing an ice pick into my shoulder – it was a blessing finally lay down in my bed and get some sleep. It took a while for me to be able to sleep on my right side.

The surgeon warned me that even if I felt good, not to push it. He told me a story of a patient that felt good and decided to play golf 3 months after the surgery. He said the patient swung the club at the golf ball and the face of the club hit the ground causing in the rotator cuff snapping. As a result, he got the privilege of re-experiencing the surgery procedure and recovery from the beginning.

I started PT (was painful) the following week after the surgery and continued for 8 weeks (2 times/week). I also performed daily exercises (stretching, elastic bands…) on my own at home. I was fortunate my therapist was a baseball pitcher and he said it would take a year to be at 100%. Well, I guess because I’m older it took me 1 ½ years before I felt I was at 100%.

He stated swinging a bat wouldn’t be an issue early in the recovery cycle but my throwing ability would be limited. He warned me to be careful throwing the ball too hard/early as I could reinjure the shoulder (didn’t want to relive that pain again) because the tissues soft and are still healing.

I began playing catch (approx. 10-20 feet) with my wife after 2 months. I began throwing a tennis ball (25% effort) at a wall (40 throws increasing – over time - to 100 throws per day) 7-days a week. As I began to feel more comfortable, I would begin to increase the speed (25%, 50%, 75%) and back up approximately 10 feet – this was over many months.

I played in a tournament about 4 months after surgery. Swing the bat was okay but I could tell I didn’t have the strength/power I had prior to the injury. Also, I didn’t throw the ball hard (lobs and relays). I began lifting light weights (5 lbs.), push-ups (5), and other exercises at 4 months and slowly increased the weight and repetitions.

I feel that I'm at 100% believe I can throw the ball just as hard as I did before the surgery – time and patience.
Nov. 25, 2017
Rainmans
Topic: Rules of the game
Discussion: 1 and 1 count

Every year this topic comes up – the never ending story (death and taxes). There are pros and cons of starting with a 0-0 or 1-1 count depending on where you stand (literally and figuratively). What is the real problem that needs to be solved, or is this a solution looking for a problem?

Each game is different and its outcome (i.e., end early, go the distance, 1-0 score…) is predicated on numerous factors. I’m confused as to the bona fide rationale/justifications for wanting to change the established and agreed to rules of the game. Most of us have played for decades (time limits, without run rule limits…) and didn’t appear to have issues. Besides, we’re getting much older and in most cases much slower.

There seems to be several approaches (not all inclusive) that have been voiced: attempt to get 7 innings of play in the time allotted for each game; reduce the amount of play time allotted for each game; increase the tournament revenue by getting more games played per day; play all 7 innings each game no matter the time it takes to complete; and there are a few more.

Possible solutions to eliminate the spirited debate are, speed up the games times, reduce the amount of time on the field for each game, and increase the revenue for each tournament might by going to a ‘one pitch’ format. I don’t believe this would be the format of choice but, then again, I have been proven wrong many times in my life.
June 27, 2017
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Rotator Cuff Surgery or not?

DCPete - agreed!
June 27, 2017
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Rotator Cuff Surgery or not?

My shoulder surgery was performed by Dr. Reuven B. Minkowitz. He performs knee, hip, and shoulder (his specialty) surgeries and replacements. In his free time, he competes in several triathlons (very good physical condition and had to keep my significant other away from him) every year so he fully understands being physically active. He understands how important it is for us to want to get back into the game.
June 26, 2017
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Rotator Cuff Surgery or not?

Wow Mike (sofball4b)! You've got a great memory to remember how old (58) I was when I had the surgery. Damn, I must have a bad case of O.L.D disease because I had to look up my medical records to find out when I had the surgery.

Cuda65, it took me about 1.5 years to get back to where I felt comfortable and I could throw the ball hard again without fear of re-damaging my arm. My recommendation, if you consider surgery and play ball, would be diligent with the physical therapy and include an exercise program to continue to strengthen your shoulder. I was driven because I wanted to play again so I was willing to do what it took to get me back on the field.
June 25, 2017
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Rotator Cuff Surgery or not?

After the surgery, I couldn’t lift my right hand without help from my left hand. I started PT (was painful) the following week after the surgery and continued for 8 weeks (2 times/week). I also did daily exercises (stretching, elastic bands…) at home. I was fortunate my therapist was a baseball pitcher and he said it would take a year to be at 100%. He stated swinging a bat wouldn’t be an issue early in the recovery cycle but my throwing ability would be limited. He warned me to be careful throwing the ball too hard/early as I could reinjure the shoulder (didn’t want to relive that pain again) because the tissues soft and are still healing. I began playing catch (approx. 10-20 feet) with my wife after 2 months and began throwing a tennis ball at a wall (40 throws increasing – over time - to 100 throws per day). I played in a tournament about 4 months after surgery. Swing the bat was okay but I could tell I didn’t have the strength/power I had prior to the injury. I also did not throw the ball hard (lobs and relays). I began lifting light weights (5 lbs.), push-ups (5), and other exercises at 4 months and have slowly increased the weight and repetitions.I'm at 100% and I feel as though I throw the ball as hard, if not harder, than I did before the surgery.
Sept. 2, 2016
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Getting released from a team you don't want to play for any longer

There is good rationale for both sides of this debate. There's always several sides to a story -- one side, the other side, and the truth. As was stated, this topic should be brought up at the rules committee for an exchange of thoughts/ideas to reach a decision on how to proceed (the devil is in the details).

As it is in most instances, every situation varies and brings its own unique circumstances. If existing rules are changed/modified or a new rule(s) are created do deal with this situation, there should be clear and concise criterion that defines each step of the process. For example, if the player/manager are unable to reach and amicable agreement within a reasonable timeframe (i.e., as defined by the process), a representative from Senior Softball would act as an arbitrator and make the final determination (e.g., the last resort, having all the facts, accomplishing additional fact finding...). Each situation would be considered on a case by case basis.
Jan. 20, 2016
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Rotator Cuff Surgery

I experienced the same damage to my throwing arm as "missouridave" described and my full recovery took about the same time (1.5 years). The advice you're getting appears to be from those who have first hand experiences (damage, recovery, PT, exercises…) and I agree with there assessments. I was fortunate to have a former pitcher as a PT and he gave me seven pages of exercises to redevelop my throwing ability. I throw the ball as good if not better than I did before the injury.

The most important advice: DO NOT RUSH THE RECOVERY!
Feb. 7, 2015
Rainmans
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Rotator surgery

I severed my rotor cuff on my throwing arm. It required arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery which required four anchors, repair of the torn labrum cartilage, and removal of bone spurs -- 3 hours of surgery. I attended all of the therapy sessions and continued the exercises along with light weight training. One of my therapist was a baseball picture and he gave me throwing exercises that were a slow progression to increase accuracy and velocity. I was able to play approximately 6 months later but was cautious, somewhat apprehensive, and there was some pain and soreness so I took it easy. I was able to reach full throwing ability in about 18 months without soreness or concern about re-injuring my shoulder. Individual result vary.
Older messages »
Senior Softball-USA
Email: info@SeniorSoftball.com
Phone: (916) 326-5303
Fax: (916) 326-5304
9823 Old Winery Place, Suite 12
Sacramento, CA 95827
Senior Softball-USA is dedicated to informing and uniting the Senior Softball Players of America and the World. Senior Softball-USA sanctions tournaments and championships, registers players, writes the rulebook, publishes Senior Softball-USA News, hosts international softball tours and promotes Senior Softball throughout the world. More than 1.5 million men and women over 40 play Senior Softball in the United States today. »SSUSA History  »Privacy policy

Follow us on Facebook

Partners